Why you should not replace your windows?

Nothing will ever look so good. And, contrary to what you may have heard from the construction and remodeling industry, new windows won't work any better.

Why you should not replace your windows?

Nothing will ever look so good. And, contrary to what you may have heard from the construction and remodeling industry, new windows won't work any better. They won't save you a lot of money on energy costs. They may not even last until you have finished paying for them.

Depending on the type of window, a well-maintained window will generally last 20 to 50 years. If you're considering replacing windows in your home or inspecting the condition of windows in a home you're interested in, you'll want to look for fogged glass, damaged frames, and drafty rooms. If your primary goal is to install a full set of energy-efficient windows or increase your exterior appeal and it's within your budget, you can replace all windows at once. Read on to learn about the potential consequences that could arise from not replacing your cracked, chipped, old, or broken windows.

If you have these problems, there are a few things you can try before embarking on a window replacement project. Tommy Ingram, vice president of sales for Coastal Windows%26 Exteriors in Beverly, said a well-made replacement window will stand the test of time Coastal guarantees all its vinyl products for 50 years, but it all comes down to quality and materials. The problem here is of course the “slippery slope”, in the sense that replacing only one window in one wall can stick out, and replacing windows on a single wall in the house can stick out. In fact, it turns out that replacing windows isn't always the energy-saving blow it's intended to be.

In these neighborhoods, you'll notice that most homes retain their original windows compared to neighborhoods with lower property values, where homes have largely replacement windows. We have discussed studies that showed that the payback period for replacement windows can be up to 250 years. So, finally, lured by the promises of tax breaks, energy savings, and a restful night's sleep, we started installing vinyl replacement windows a handful. I suggest you seal around any leaking panels or frames, maybe, but you'll never get your money from the full replacement, so there's no point in staying awake stressing about it.

TreeHugger favorite Ted Kesik has said that “preserving historic windows not only conserves their built-in energy, but also eliminates the need to spend energy on replacing windows. From a money-saving standpoint, a full house window replacement job rarely justifies the cost, although it depends on whether extensive work is going to be needed to renovate old windows as well. If you know that your home needs new windows but you delay replacing them, a number of serious problems could arise.